New Issue, Representations 132

Number 132, Fall 2015 (Read on Highwire)

TIMOTHY HAMPTON
Absolutely Modern:
Dylan, Rimbaud, and Visionary Song

ANICIA TIMBERLAKE
Brecht for Children: Shaping the Ideal GDR Citizen
Through Opera Education

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SPECIAL FORUM: Quirk Historicism
Edited by Nicholas Mathew and Mary Ann Smart

NICHOLAS MATHEW and MARY ANN SMART (free download)
Elephants in the Music Room: The Future of Quirk Historicism

JAMES Q. DAVIES
On Being Moved/Against Objectivity

EMILY I. DOLAN
Musicology in the Garden

ELLEN LOCKHART
Pygmalion and the Music of Mere Interest

AOIFE MONKS
Bad Art, Quirky Modernism

BENJAMIN PIEKUT
Pigeons

BENJAMIN WALTON
Quirk Shame

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FIELD NOTES

RANDOLPH STARN   Touching the Intangible:
Toward an Alternative Genealogy of Intellectual Property

New Issue, Representations 131

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Number 131, Summer 2015 (Read at JSTOR)

URTE KRASS   A Case of Corporate Identity: The Multiplied Face of Saint Antonino of Florence

IAN CORNELIUS    Gower and the Peasants’ Revolt

DAVID HENKIN    Hebdomadal Form: Diaries, News, and the Shape of the Modern Week

PAUL REITTER AND CHAD WELLMON   How the Philologist Became a Physician of Modernity: Nietzsche’s Lectures on German Education

CHRISTOPHER WEINBERGER   Reflexive Realism and Kinetic Ethics: The Case of Murakami Haruki’s 1Q84

New Issue, Representations 130

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BEATE FRICKE    Presence Through Absence: Thresholds and Mimesis in Painting

PATRICIA SIEBER    Universal Brotherhood Revisited: Peter Perring Thoms (1790-1855), Artisan Practices, and the Genesis of A Chinacentric Sinology

S. PEARL BRILMYER    Plasticity, Form and the Matter of Character in Middlemarch

PAULA AMAD    Film as the “Skin of History”: André Bazin and the Specter of the Archive and Death in Nicole Védrès’s Paris 1900 (1947)

ROBERT J. KETT    Monumentality as Method: Archaeology and Land Art in the Cold War

New Issue, Representations 129

Representations 129

CHRISTOPHER MEAD   ‘‘Content to be Pressed’’: Robert Burton and the editio princeps hominisREP129_Cover_1.indd

PETER SAHLINS    The Beast Within: Animals in the First Xenotransfusion Experiments in France, ca. 1667–68

NOAH HERINGMAN    Deep Time at the Dawn of the Anthropocene

JONATHAN BROOKS PLATT    Snow White and the Enchanted Palace: A Reading of Lenin’s Architectural Cult

ALEXEI YURCHAK    Bodies of Lenin: The Hidden Science of Communist Sovereignty

New Issue, Representations 128

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DAVID NIRENBERG   “Judaism” as Political Concept: Toward a Critique of Political Theology

ALICE GOFF   The Selbst Gewählter Plan: The Schildbach Wood Library in Eighteenth-Century Hessen-Kassel

AMANDA JO GOLDSTEIN   Growing Old Together: Lucretian Materialism in Shelley’s “Poetry of Life”

CHRISTOPHER L. HILL   Crossed Geographies: Endō and Fanon in Lyon

PAUL ROQUET   A Blue Cat on the Galactic Railroad: Anime and Cosmic Subjectivity

New Issue, Representations 127

Representations 127, featuring a special forum on SEARCH

Edited and introduced by Kent Puckett

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FREDERIC KAPLAN  Linguistic Capitalism and Algorithmic Mediation
TED UNDERWOOD  Theorizing Research Practices We Forgot to Theorize Twenty Years         Ago
LISA GITELMAN  Searching and Thinking About Searching JSTOR
DANIEL ROSENBERG  Stop, Words
LEAH PRICE  Response

Plus:

ERIC BULSON
Ulysses by Numbers

SARAH BROUILLETTE
Unesco and the Book in the Developing World

And:

FIELD NOTES: Catherine Malabou, The King’s Two (Biopolitical) Bodies

New Special Issue

Financialization and the Culture Industry

Edited by C. D. Blanton, Colleen Lye, and Kent Puckett

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Financialization and the culture industry. The essays that make up this special issue of Representations turn on the relation between those two terms. How, they ask, should we understand the formal and cultural effects of a world economy ever more dependent on finance’s increasingly abstract calculations of value? In one respect, the metaphor of a “culture industry” might now appear anachronistic, swept aside by the postindustrial speed, scale, and global reach of contemporary finance. But what then remains of notions—inherited from the Frankfurt School and elsewhere—of high and low culture, art and reification, commitment and commodity, class struggle and rationalization in an economy now conceived as immaterial or disembodied, frictionless or flat? (Continue reading…)

C. D. Blanton, Colleen Lye, and Kent Puckett
Introduction (free download)
Joshua Clover
Retcon: Value and Temporality in Poetics
Annie McClanahan
Bad Credit: The Character of Credit Scoring
Bishnupriya Ghosh
The Security Aesthetic in Bollywood’s High-Rise Horror
Joseph Jonghyun Jeon
Neoliberal Forms: CGI, Algorithm, and Hegemony in Korea’s IMF Cinema
Michael Szalay
HBO’s Flexible Gold
Peter Hitchcock
Accumulating Fictions

Symposium: The Literary and Its Outsides

Denotatively, Technically, Literally
The Literary and Its Outsides
Tuesday, April 1, 5–7:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
Townsend Center for the Humanities
UC Berkeley

Presenters:

Margaret Cohen (Stanford University)
Ian Duncan (UC Berkeley)
Elaine Freedgood (New York University)
Cannon Schmitt (University of Toronto)

Discussants:

Stephen Best (UC Berkeley)
Kent Puckett (UC Berkeley)
Four contributors to the current special issue of Representations (No. 125, Winter 2014), co-edited by Elaine Freedgood and Cannon Schmitt, will offer reflections on language–denotative, technical, literal–conventionally excluded from critical reading and, thus, from “literature.” Discussants include Stephen Best (editorial board, Representations, co-editor of the special issue “Surface Reading,” No. 108, 2009) and Kent Puckett (co-chair, editorial board, Representations).

Co-sponsored by:

Representations
The Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, UCB
The Nineteenth Century and Beyond Working Group, UCB
The Florence Green Bixby Chair in English, UCB

Denotatively, Technically, Literally

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For literary readers, the categories of the denotative, literal, and technical do not, cannot, or should not exist. No language can be denotative or literal for us, since language, above all literary language, never means what it says, pace recent attempts to declare otherwise. A purely technical language would be the opposite of the language of the literary text: operational in precisely the way the literary text is not. We do not use Heart of Darkness as a sailing manual or a handbook for the extraction of natural resources from colonized places, and we have no doubt that those who treat Thomas Hardy’s novels as travel guides to southwestern England are missing the point (although a large tourist industry does thus operationalize them, and quite successfully)….

–Elaine Freedgood and Cannon Schmitt

Continue reading this introduction to Representations 125, the special issue Denotatively, Technically, Literally, here.